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Home Facts SOA Manuals Counter Intelligence Chapters 23-26
Chapters 23-26 PDF Print E-mail
LN324-91

CHAPTER XXIII

EXTRACTING CI INFORMATION

INTRODUCTION:

Wheedling is applied always with a specific purpose in mind. The
objective, or the information desired, is the SUBJECT'S determining factor, of
the wheedler, and the environment.

GENERAL FACTS:

A. Definition of WHEEDLING: Wheedling is the technique of obtaining
the greatest amount of information/useful intelligence, from a person or
source, so that the person does not know our purpose.

1. Before starting the wheedling there are requirements of CI
collection to be reviewed:

a. Identify the required specific information.

b. Identify the wheedling objective.

2. Select the SUBJECT of the wheedling according to his access to, or
knowledge of, the information desired.

3. Obtain and evaluate all information available in regards to the
SUBJECT in the wheedling:

a. Carry out the review of files and try to obtain the following
information about the SUBJECT:

1) History

2) Motivations

3) Emotions

4) Psychological nature

5) Habits or patterns

6) Favorite visiting places. (bars, restaurants, discos, etc.)

7) Favorite hobbies


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8) What level of knowledge he has about security that person has.

9) If he has been previously used in other wheedling intents by other
CI agents.

4. Determine in what place/specific environment the wheedling will
take place.

a. Select the place where the approximation to the SUBJECT/Source
will take place.

NOTE: A SUBJECT must be approached in a natural environment to avoid raising
his suspicion.

b. Obtain al the information about the place selected:

1) Identify all the place's irregular traces or facts.

2) Identify what type of clothes will be required to enter that
place. (Formal: shirt and tie; Informal: shorts, jeans, etc).

3) Identify the money requirements. (It is a place where food or
products are expensive or cheap).

4) Identify possible security problems

5) Identify if the place has been used previously as a wheedling
place.

c. Select the date and time more desirable for the approximation.

5. Select for yourself a logical story (cover), one that could be
credible and is according WITH the situation. The history must explain:

a. The reason you have to be in the chosen place for the
approximation.

b. The agent's actions during the conversation.

6. Carry out the approximation using one of two approximation
techniques: Flattery and Provocation, or any variation of these two techniques
as mentioned below:








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a. Use the flattery method:

1) Appeal to the ego, pride of the SUBJECT. Give him (SUBJECT)
the opportunity to show pride or so that he flatters himself about his
triumphs and gains.

2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT is an expert in a specific area,
topic or theme. In this manner you will give him the opportunity to feel as if
he is the teacher and you are the pupil.

3) Offer him (SUBJECT) valid and honest assistance.

4) Discuss areas of mutual interest. (Hobbies, work, sports,
etc.)

NOTE: The agent must have a good knowledge of the theme he thinks he will
choose to show mutual interest (that is to be able to follow the conversation
professionally)

b. Use the approach method of provocation to open the conversation
WITH the SUBJECT:

1) Adopt an attitude as if you do not believe what the SUBJECT
says:

"What you say, is very difficult to believe, you have to explain it to
me in more detail to see if it is true".

2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT really does not know anything of
what he is talking about.

7. Once the approach has taken place, take the conversation to the
area of interest:

a. Try to obtain more information give him answers that the SUBJECT
finds obscure and that require more information to clarify them.

b. Ask the SUBJECT for more. information when his answers are not
clear enough: ("I agree WITH you, although, what does it mean....").

NOTE: Be persistent without being abusive, bored or insolent.







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c. Present a hypothetical situation that could be associated WITH an
idea or thought expressed by the SUBJECT.

NOTE: Many persons that normally do not make comments about a real situation,
will give his opinion about hypothetical situations.

d. Use your imagination and initiative to keep complete control of
the conversation at all times.

8. Finish the (unclear]a. Use the flattery method:

1) Appeal to the ego, pride of the SUBJECT. Give him (SUBJECT)
the opportunity to show pride or so that he flatters himself about his
triumphs and gains.

2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT is an expert in a specific area,
topic or theme. In this manner you will give him the opportunity to feel as if
he is the teacher and you are the pupil.

3) Offer him (SUBJECT) valid and honest assistance.

4) Discuss areas of mutual interest. (Hobbies, work, sports,
etc.)

NOTE: The agent must have a good knowledge of the theme he thinks he will
choose to show mutual interest (that is to be able to follow the conversation
professionally).

b. Use the approach method of provocation to open the conversation
WITH the SUBJECT:

1) Adopt an attitude as if you do not believe what the SUBJECT
says:

"What you say, is very difficult to believe, you have to explain it to
me in more detail to see if it is true".

2) Insinuate that the SUBJECT really does not know anything of
what he is talking about.

7. Once the approach has taken place, take the conversation to the
area of interest:

a. Try to obtain more information give him answers that the SUBJECT
finds obscure and that require more information to clarify them.

b. Ask the SUBJECT for more information when his answers are not
clear enough: ("I agree WITH you, although, what does it mean....").

NOTE: Be persistent without being abusive, bored or insolent.

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c. Present a hypothetical situation that could be associated WITH an
idea or thought expressed by the SUBJECT.

NOTE: Many persons that normally do not make comments about a real situation,
will give his opinion about hypothetical situations.

d. Use your imagination and initiative to keep complete control of
the conversation at all times.

8. Finish the wheedling as soon as you obtain all the
information desired:

a. Change the conversation theme to others before leaving and bidding
goodbye to the SUBJECT.

b. Present various non-pertinent themes to avoid that the SUBJECT
discovers its true purpose. (Wheedle intelligence information).

c. Finish the conversation in a normal manner.

9. Take notes of all the official funds expenses.

B. Prepare the required reports.




















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CHAPTER XXIV

DETECTING CI TARGETS

INTRODUCTION:

The identification of CI targets are done through the intelligence
rules. A data base WITH a line and block box, used in connection WITH existing
black, grey and white lists, intelligence reports and additional information
from the police agencies, army and other agencies, provides us WITH basic
information required to identify the potential CI targets.

GENERAL FACTS:

A. Review the CI estimate to determine the hostile threat:

1. Identify those threats to security that are of an immediate
nature.

2. Identify anticipated future threats.

NOTE: The selection of CI targets must be based in an evaluation of a
complete hostile threat.

B. Identify the specific CI targets of the local area:

a. The CI targets are of interest due to the threat that they
present, or the usefulness to the Armed Forces. CI targets include:

a. PERSONALITIES (SEE FIGURES #2, 3 and 4): that could or not be
friendly or hostile.

b. INSTALLATIONS (SEE FIGURE #5): that represent a threat to the
national security.

c. ORGANIZATIONS AND TeamS (SEE FIGURE #6): that represent a threat
to the national security. Its threat perhaps is not openly detectable due to
their undercover operation methods.

d. DOCUMENTS AND MATERIALS (SEE FIGURE #7): WITH value to the
intelligence or the counter intelligence.

NOTE: Use the CI Work Sheet (SEE FIGURE #1) as the principal paper to assist
in the development of the targets:


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3. Obtain information about the potential CI targets in the local
area:

a. Extract the local targets from the CI target lists at
national level.

b. Extract information from the existing Black lists (SEE
FIGURE #2), White (SEE FIGURE #3), and Grey (SEE FIGURE #4).

c. Extract information from the intelligence files, CI data
base, and similar files.

d. Obtain information from:

1) Civilian Affairs and Psychological Operations (G5)

2) Local intelligence units

3) Police elements

C. Categorize the CI targets identified by the specialty or function.
Examples:

1) Espionage agents
2) Sabotage specialists
3) Messengers
4) Camps or bases
5) Communications and link routes

NOTE: To categorize the targets in this manner, it is essential that the
history detailed information is obtained from the same source that was used to
identify them.

D. Assign priorities to the targets:

1. Determine the priority of each Target based on:

a. The threat to the national security that the target
represents.

b. The urgency or the need to neutralize or exploit the target.

c. The future capacities that await the target.

d. The capacities of the units responsible to neutralize or
exploit the targets.

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2. Assign a numerical priority to each target:

a. The numerical designations are always expressed in roman
numerals (I, IV, XI).

b. The numerical designation emphasizes the relative importance
or the value of the CI targets.

c. The numerical designation expresses the level of interest of
the target.

NOTE: If a target has been assigned a priority at a level higher than the
Command, you at your level cannot alter this priority designation. The local
CI elements will assign priorities to targets locally developed.

E. Assign the responsibilities of the units to neutralization or
exploitation of each target:

1. Determine the capacities of the units to carry out
neutralization or exploitation missions based on:

a. Amount of personnel
b. Equipment available
c. Specific experience

2. Identify the need, if any, to request support from the
military police, infantry, national police, etc.

NOTE: The tactical effort, except in special cases, takes precedence over the
neutralization and exploitation of the targets.

F. Notify the units of their mission(s).












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FIGURE #1
CI TARGETS WORK SHEET

REFERENCES TO CHARTS, MAPS DATE:

_________________________________________________________________

KEYS TO CHART:
1. Target
2. Target classification
3. Priority
4. Localization
5. Team task
6. Team mission (Comments)
7. An administrative number that is written down in chronological order.
8. The classification identifies the target by type, name and provides
specific data for identification about the target.
9. The priority is designated WITH roman numerals and is assigned based
upon the target classification.
10. The localization will identify the place where you may find the target
or if this is not known, it is identified where the target was found the last
time.
11. The team's task of identifying the CI team whose mission is to
neutralize the target is based in the number of persons available and could
include tactical forces, military police and para-military forces.
12. This column is used to make a list of the coordination requirements,
communications, specific details of the mission or other specific information
required so that the team could fulfill its mission.















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FIGURE #2
BLACK LISTS

THESE CONTAIN THE IDENTITIES AND LOCALIZATIONS OF PERSONS WHOSE CAPTURE
AND DETENTION ARE OF FOREMOST IMPORTANCE TO THE ARMED FORCES:

EXAMPLES

a. Enemy agents known or suspects, persons involved in espionage,
sabotage, politics, and subversive persons.

b. Hostile para-military guerilla team leaders, known or suspects.

c. Political leaders known or suspected as hostile toward the Armed
Forces or the political interests of the National Government.

d. Known or suspected leaders of enemy governments whose presence in
the area of operations represent a threat the national security.

e. Collaborators and sympathizers of the enemy, known or suspects
whose presence in the area of operations represent a threat to the national
security.

f. Military and civilian enemies, known or suspected of having
participated in intelligence activities, counter-intelligence, security,
police or political indoctrination between the troops or among civilians.

g. Other personalities identified by the G2 as of immediate
detention. This could include local political personalities, chiefs of police,
and municipal leaders or leaders of the enemy's government departments.












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FIGURE #3
GREY LISTS

CONTAINS THE IDENTITIES AND LOCALIZATION OF THOSE PERSONALITIES WHOSE
INCLINATIONS AND ACTIVITIES TOWARD THE POLITICAL AND MILITARY OBJECTIVES OF
THE GOVERNMENT ARE OBSCURE (THAT IS, NOTHING IS KNOWN ABOUT THEM). THEIR
INCLINATIONS OR ATTITUDES DOES NOT MATTER, IF THEY HAVE SOME INFORMATION OR
SKILLS THAT ARE OF INTEREST TO THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. THOSE PERSONS WHOSE
INCLINATIONS OR POLITICAL MOTIVATIONS REQUIRE MORE EXPLORATION OR EVALUATION
BEFORE THEY COULD BE USED EFFECTIVELY BY THE GOVERNMENT CANNOT BE INCLUDED.

EXAMPLES

a. Defectors or potential defectors of the enemy cause whose
motivation or loyalty has not been yet established.

b. Persons that have resisted or are believed to have resisted the
enemy government and that perhaps are willing to cooperate WITH the Armed
Forces of the National Government, but their motivation or loyalty has not yet
been established.

c. Nuclear scientists, physicists and technical personnel suspected
of having participated in development of nuclear projects for the enemy, or
nuclear missile programs, against their will.














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FIGURE #4
WHITE LISTS

CONTAIN THE IDENTITIES AND LOCALIZATION OF PERSONS IN AREAS CONTROLLED BY THE
ENEMY WHO HAVE BEEN IDENTIFIED AS OF INTEREST TO THE INTELLIGENCE OR TO THE
COUNTER INTELLIGENCE, AND IT IS EXPECTED THAT THEY COULD PROVIDE INFORMATION
OR ASSISTANCE IN THE ACCUMULATION OF INTELLIGENCE OR IN THE EXPLOITATION OF
AREAS OF INTEREST. NORMALLY THESE PERSONS AGREE WITH, OR FAVORABLY BEND
TOWARDS THE BELIEFS OF THE NATIONAL GOVERNMENT. THEIR CONTRIBUTIONS ARE BASED
IN A VOLUNTARY AND COOPERATIVE ATTITUDE. THE DECISION TO PLACE A PERSON IN A
WHITE LIST COULD BE AFFECTED BY THE COMBAT SITUATION, THE CRITICAL NEED FOR
SPECIALISTS IN THE SCIENTIFIC FIELDS AND OTHER INTELLIGENCE NEEDS.

a. Ex-political leaders of a hostile government that were deposed by
the hostile political leaders.

b. Intelligence agents employed by the National Government.

c. Key civilians in the scientific development areas could include
members of university faculties, whose loyalty has been established.

d. Religious team leaders and other humanitarian team leaders.

e. Other persons who could give significant material support to
political objectives, scientists and military personnel of the National
Government and whose loyalty has been established.











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FIGURE #5
INSTALLATIONS

1. COMMAND POSTS.

2. COMMUNICATION CENTERS.

3. INVESTIGATION AND DEVELOPMENT CENTERS, LABORATORIES.

4. INSTALLATIONS THAT FORMERLY OR AT PRESENT ARE OCCUPIED BY ENEMY
ESPIONAGE AGENCIES, SABOTAGE, AND INSURRECTION, OR ENEMY POLICE ORGANIZATIONS
INCLUDING PRISONS.

5. INSTALLATIONS OCCUPIED BY ENEMY INTELLIGENCE ORGANIZATIONS OR SECURITY.

6. BELLIGERENT DEPOTS.

7. EMBASSIES OR HOSTILE GOVERNMENT CONSULATES.

8. MILITARY INSTALLATIONS.

9. PARA-MILITARY Team CAMPS

FIGURE #6
ORGANIZATIONS AND TeamS

1. Local or national political party teams, or parties that have
goals, beliefs or ideologies contrary or in opposition to the National
Government.

2. Para-military organizations including student teams, police,
military and veterans, or ex-fighter teams that are hostile towards the
National Government.

3. Teams or hostile organizations whose objective is to create
dissention or cause restlessness among the civilian population in the area of
operations.

4. The central offices of these hostile organizations according to
what the Commander of the Armed Forces says will be immediately neutralized.
Personalities related WITH these offices will be arrested and detained.

5. Teams that operate undercover or clandestinely and their
infrastructure.

6. Intelligence networks.



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FIGURE #7
DOCUMENTS AND MATERIALS

1. Files at bases, training centers and enemy intelligence schools.

2. Court files (Judicial), prisons, police, and the political
administrative executives.

3. National intelligence agencies' files, para-military
organizations, and the enemy's secret police agencies.

4. Products or other materials that, if left unguarded could provide
support to the enemy guerrilla in the area.

5. Special war materials:

a. Chemical war products

b. Harmful materials

c. New combat products

d. Rockets and rocket control centers

e. Airships

f. Charts and maps warehouses

g. Communication equipment, including radios, radars and electronic
equipment.











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CHAPTER XXV]
NEUTRALIZING CI TARGETS

INTRODUCTION:

When identifying the potential CI target, those are categorized by their
corresponding types. It is imperative to know not only the identity of the
target or the team, but also all the possible history information and
functions of the target. Experiences have shown us that a follow-up of a
specific target, the best methods are traps and intercept tactics.

GENERAL FACTS:

A. Determine what Target is going to be neutralized.

B. Analyze the CI target work sheet (SEE FIGURE #1) to be able to
identify:

1. The target that has been assigned to your CI team (columns 2 and
5)

2. The target localization (column 4).

3. The necessary requirements for this coordination (column 6).

C. Determine the method for neutralization of personalities:

1. Select the method to neutralize personalities:

a. Place the identity of the target in the black grey and white
lists (REFER TO CHAPTER XXIII).

NOTE: Placing the target identity in the above-mentioned lists do not
neutralizes him if the target is "undercover" or "clandestine", but it
constitutes the first phase of this type of neutralization and allows the
friendly forces to detain the target if they find him in the area of
operations.

b. Carry out the investigation operations and or approach and search
and review to segregate, identify and detain the target personalities.

[REFER TO CHAPTER XXIV, DETECTING CI TARGETS, FIGURE #1--CI TARGET WORK SHEET)



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c. Carry out the psychological operations against the personalities:

1) Carry out the propaganda operations to discredit the target.

NOTE: Operations of this type must be prepared in detail and coordinated
through the G5 (Civilian Affairs).

2) Carry out operations so as to make the target supervisors
loose trust in him.

3) Carry out operations so that the enemy believes that his
agent(s) has been uncovered or committed.

d. Carry out Deceit/conceal operations. Neutralization through
deception could work WITH the use of false information to confuse the target.

e. Neutralize the personality target through the capture, detention
or the exile.

f. Use the population control and other resources:

1) Use controls to locate and capture the target, such as:

a) Search all persons in the target's area.

b) Give identity badges to the population.

c) Impose rationing of resources, such as, provisions,
the food, etc., and give the population rationing cards.

NOTE: The targets that are of CI interest will try to avoid all these
controls so as to avoid been captured or identified. Persons that do not have
the badge in their possession or the rationing card, automatically will become
suspicious.

2) Use controls to limit or slow down the movements of the
target, such as:

a) Requiring official passes to access specific areas.





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b) Implement a curfew which will restrict all movement
during specific hours of the day.

c) Use restricted areas to deny the target to have access
to certain activities.

2. Select methods to neutralize the teams. The same methods
that are used to neutralize the personalities could be used for the teams. An
additional method is to infiltrate an agent within the infrastructure a team
to spread rumors and false information.

3. Select a method to neutralize the installations:

a. Carry out approach, search and review operations to:

1) Segregate and contain the persons or teams in the particular
installation or area.

2) Investigation, identification, and detention of a CI target.

b. Carry out combat operations to:

1) Segregate and contain the installations.

2) Detain the occupants.

3) Destroy the installation.

c. Carry out deception and conceal operations that cause
the CI target to change the direction of his intelligence collection and to
prevent him to concentrate WITH his main mission.

3) Select methods to neutralize documents:

a. The two basic methods to neutralize documents are:

1) Capture
2) Destruction

b. Any of the two methods could be carried out using the
operations of review, investigation and combat mentioned above to effectively
neutralize the documents and so prevent the enemy from using them.




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D. Determine the operational requirements:

1. Determine the personal requirements (How many persons you
need for the operation):

a. Determine the number of persons

b. Determine what qualifications and skills will be needed to
fulfill the mission (interrogation agents, interpreters, etc.)

c. Determine what special support you need for the mission:

1) Support from the combat troops to close the area where
the search and review operations will take place.

2) Military police to give support during the review
operations.

3) Determine (if possible) if the installation area is
mined or if it has traps (booby traps).

4) Determine what other additional support you may need.

2. Determine the team requirements:

a. Identify the arms that the teams will need to carry out the
review and detention.

b. Identify what type of communications you will use.

c. Determine if you will need any codes or special key words.

d. Identify what transport support you will need.

e. Identify how you will transport the targets, or how you will
evacuate the area.

3. Determine the time frame:

a. Determine how much time you will need to carry out the
neutralization.

b. Identify the ideal time to carry out the attack against the
target.




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c. Determine if vigilance is needed and if there is enough time
to carry out the same.

d. Determine on what date should the mission be completed.

E. Prepare the operational plan:

1. Coordinate WITH the appropriate commanders to get the support
personnel.

2. Arrange the procurement of the specialized team.

3. Procure the official funds for the operation.

4. Procure the communication equipment.

5. Coordinate WITH the combat commanders in the area the whereabouts
of the target.

a. Inform the commander when, where, what and how the operation
will take place to avoid conflicts in your responsibility area.

b. Make arrangements for any assistance you may need while in
that area.

c. Coordinate the support of (short and long arms) in case it
would be necessary.

6. Guide the team over the concept of the operation. Make sure that
all the members of the team are aware of their responsibilities.

7. Guide the support troops:

a. Explain in detail the role they will play in the operation.

b. Indicate if they need arms or specialized equipment.

c. Emphasize the need to fulfill the time frame requirements.

F. Carry out the operation:

1. Move towards the target.

a. Carry out a final check to make sure that all the
participants understand their responsibilities.


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b. Carry out a final coordination if necessary.

1. Safeguard the target:

a. Make sure that the troops are in their assigned positions.

b. Carry out the review and detention.

2. Dispose of the target:

a. Arrange the transfer of the target personnel and or the
documents.

b. Destroy the target installations.



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CHAPTER XXVI

OBSERVATION AND DESCRIPTION

INTRODUCTION:

Our ability to perceive depends upon our innate ability, experience and
the training in regards to our surroundings and the environment. You must keep
in mind that the word perceive means to see and understand.

GENERAL FACTS:

a. Definition: OBSERVATION: Is the ability to recognize what is
happening around us and the environment. This is attained through the maximum
use of the five senses. Carrying out a detailed observation allows a person to
remember any object, or situation in a complete, clear and exact manner.

b. Observation requires a mental effort to identify, analyze and
relate what as happenang an our surroundings and the environment.

c. It is a normal thing that a person perceives or understands only
that which interests him or what does not require much effort. Example:

(1) Women, in general, are more interested in colors, since
their physical appearance depends on the exact combination of colors,
therefore, a woman, may have more knowledge in describing something she saw,
although only for a few seconds. She knows the different colors better and
could bring an exact description of what she saw.
















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(2) In contrast, men normally do not know colors well, or do not
pay much attention when they observe them. Men normally remember the basic
colors. If a man observes an automobile involved in an incident and wishes to
describe it he will probably say "it was a blue automobile", but if a woman
makes the same description about the same automobile, maybe she will do it in
this manner: "it was a light blue automobile, WITH black and white trims".
This does not mean that all mean and women are the same, but it is something
that happens often and could be considered as a patter in regards to
observation.

d. To train in observing WITH exactness the CI Special Agent (SA)
must:

(1) Practice continually and in detail to recognize what happens
in his surroundings and environment and in that manner try to observe and
understand the personalities, situations, objects and incidents.

(2) Replace the casual observations wit the studies and detailed
observations.

(3) Train yourself and practice estimating:

a. The time (hours)
b. The speed of an object that is moving
c. The distance

(4) The SA must be familiar WITH colors, the variety of colors,
and the intensity of the light.

(5) The SA must have the ability to observe objects and
incidents in such manner that it will become potential evidence in an
investigation.

e. The SA must keep in mind that his senses could fail, and he should
know that not all persons will give a detailed description of what was
observed, although they are telling about the same incident. The SA must know
that the witnesses are telling the truth, but that each person sees things in
their own way.

f. To become an expert observer the SA must learn to pay attention
and concentrate in particular details in the face and characteristics of an
object or scene.








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g. When the SA questions a witness about an incident, his questions
could be addressed only about what the person remembers and not make
suggestions that could influence the description the witness gives.

h. The power to listen well is also required in training. The SA
could train his "ear memory" practicing to listen the conversations intently
WITH the purpose of obtaining the greatest amount of information possible. One
particular way is to have the ability to listen to sermons in church, school,
political meetings, or any speech in a way that after listening to these
speeches the SA could later write down in a paper what he listened to.

i. The visual observation training does not require that the SA
intently observes all and remember each face or each scene, but, he must
concentrate in such details that could be useful in his investigations.

j. Functions of the senses during the observation:

The exactness of an observation will depend upon the senses used to make
the observation. You could trust some senses more that others, and the SA must
take this into consideration when evaluating their observations. The senses
that are used during the observations are:

(1) VISUAL: It is considered as the most precise sense. WITH just
observing some characteristics of a person the SA could complete the image
WITH known facts.

(2) HEARING: This is the most objective sense. When making and
observation based in the sound there is not always precision. Frequently, you
do not know the origin of the sound or the distance from where it came. The
variety of sounds also are difficult to describe. When listening to a sound,
the witness normally tries to associate it WITH some other known sound so as
to make a comparison later on.

(3) TACT: In most people, the sense of tact is not well developed and
it must be considered as a limited means of perception. Without the help of a
visual perception the sense of tact could confuse us, in such way that an
observation in the dark using the sense of tact could be very doubtful.
Nevertheless, the sense of tact of the blind persons is well developed.









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(4) SMELL: The sense of smell is not to be trusted much. Many things
have the same smell and for that reason an observation based on this sense
must not be taken very seriously.

(5) TASTE: The sense of taste is not very trustworthy since this sense
is very personal and the objective observation of taste is easily replaced by
the persons s individual sensation.

k. Psychologists indicate that:

(1) 85% of what we learn is through the visual sense.
(2) 13% is learned through the sense of hearing.
(3) 2% is through the sense of tact, smell and taste.

l. Psychological elements of observation:

The SA must know both elements of observation and the
observation's psychological obstacles so as to properly evaluate an
observation.

m. The observation process in order of occurrence is:

(1) The SA must have the ability to obtain a complete physical
description of a person in a few seconds. This ability could be acquired
through:

a) Knowledge of the meaning of words used to describe the
characteristics.

b) Practice the description of one or two
characteristics, such as the eyes and the nose, of different persons and
continue this until all the characteristics have been completely studied.

c) Train to define the descriptions in a precise order.
Example: from the head to the feet (hair, forehead, ears, eyes, etc.)













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n. The SA does not always have time to obtain a complete description
of a person, in this case he must concentrate in the following:

(1) Outstanding characteristics, such as moles, scars, lack of
an arm, leg or other limbs.

(2) Height
(3) Built
(4) Weight
(5) Age
(6) Race
(7) Sex
(8) Eyes
(9) Hair
(10) Complexion
(11) Nationality or citizenship
(12) Clothes




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