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Learn More About the Prisoners of Conscience PDF Print E-mail

November 2003

Final Sentences for the SOA 27
45 Total Arrests:

  • 29 for Civil Disobedience
  • 1 for Refusing to Submit to a Police Search
  • 15 for Accidentally Driving on an Interstate Highway into Fort Benning

    Write to the Prisoners of Conscience!


    Arrested for Civil Disobedience



    Photo of the SOA 27: Left to right in front row:  Mary Vaughn (71;24 month probation; $500 fine); “Ozone” (90 days); Kathleen Kelly (90 days); Leisa Barnes (90 days, $500 fine); Elizabeth Bradley (12 month probation, $500 fine); Alice Gerard (90 days, $500 fine); Louise Lynch (69, 12 month probation, $500 fine); Michael Walli (90 days, $500 fine).

    Left to right in middle row:  Fr. Jerry Zawada, OFM (66, 6 months); Greg Poferl (90 days, $1000 fine); Faith Fippinger (90 days); Craig Adams (90 days); Sarah Jobe (12 months probation, $1,500 fine); Betsy Lamb (6 months + $500 fine); Bro. Mike O’Grady, SJ (90 days); Peg Morton (73, 90 days); Shirley Way (90 days).

    Left to right in top row:  Fr. Joe Mulligan, SJ (90 days); Rich Wekerle (67, 6 months); Sr. Cynthia Brinkman, SSND (67, 6 months); The Rev. Don Beisswenger (73, 6 months, $1000 fine); Fr. Bernie Survil (90 days); Dave Corcoran (69, 6 months); Eric “E-Dawg” Robison (6 months, $1000 fine).

    Inset (left, center, right): Scott Diehl (90 days, $500 fine); Gary Ashbeck (6 months); Fr. Ben Jimenez, SJ (90 days)


  • Craig Adams, a social worker and member of Minneapolis Shambhala Buddhist Center from Glenwood, Wisconsin. Born in 1951, Craig is married to Lucy Altemus and has three children, the youngest of which, Louis, is just graduating from high school.


  • "I first visited Nicaragua in 1984 as a dairy farmer. In 1989 we sold our dairy cows in order to live in witness and solidarity on cooperative in Nicaragua. Several months before we arrived, two farmers from the cooperative were kidnapped and killed by the U.S. funded and trained Contras. We were founders of a grassroots rural peace and friendship group called Farmer to Farmer that has become good friends of a group of farmer/weavers in Guatemala. This group lost members in a massacre (Santiago Atitlan, 1990) at the hands of the Guatemalan Army. It is painful to personally know people who have lost loved ones due to our government's policies of supporting terrorist training, like that given at the SOA/WHISC. As a member of the Witness for Peace/SOAW delegation to Colombia in 2002 I was struck by the dedication of so many Colombians who continue to risk working for peace and nonviolence in the face of so much repression. These brave Colombians told our delegation that it is only the American people themselves who have enough power to change the repressive foreign policy of our government. It is a great joy for me to make such a small sacrifice to try to close the US. Army SOA, an institution that has taken so much life from the people of Latin America."

    Craig Adams' court statement
    An article about Craig published in several Wisconsin papers.

    Sentenced to 3 months federal prison. Craig was released from FCI Duluth in Minnesota in late September after serving a 3-month sentence.


  • Gary Ashbeck of Jonah House in Baltimore, Maryland, climbed over the fence at Fort Benning, was arrested, and refused to post bond. He stayed in Muscogee County Jail from his arrest on November 23, 2003, through his trial on January 28, 2004. He returned to Muscogee before being transferred to Harris County Jail and then to FCI Schuylkill in Pennsylvania. He was released on Friday, May 21st.


  • Gary's court statement.
    Statement by Gary and six other defendants in English and in Spanish.

    Gary was released on Friday, May 21 after serving 6 months in county jails and federal prison.


  • Leisa Faulkner Barnes of Sacramento, California is a single mother of five sons. She founded Campus Peace Action in February 2003, and the organization grew to 450 students and faculty within months. After crossing the line this year in November, Leisa recieved her degree in Black and White Fine Art Photography. Leisa enjoys traveling as often as possible, and hopes to make a trip to Iraq and Egypt this year. Leisa loves to run by rivers, walk on beaches, and sleep in the sun.

    An article about Leisa published in the Sacramento Bee.

    Click here to read Leisa's latest prison journal entry.

    Sentenced to 3 months and a $500 fine. Leisa was released from FCI Dublin in California on July 2.


  • Don Beisswenger, a Presybyterian Minister, lives in Nashville, TN. Don was born in 1930 in Minneapolis, MN, and with his late wife had 6 children, 8 grandchildren and 8 foster children.

    "As a minister in Chicago I helped develop an industrial ministry, a variation on the worker-priest work started in France after the second world war. In 1968 I went to Vanderbilt to serve on the faculty in the area of practical theology. I taught in the area of Leadership in Church and Society as well as Conflict management in church and society. In 1996 I respired (retired), took new breath and focused my energy on the global war against the poor in various ways: working with homeelss persons here in Nashville, working on affordable rental housing, and around debt cancellation through Jubilee 2000.

    "In 1959 I attended the meeting of the World Alliance of Reformed Churches in Sao Paulo, Brazil, travelling through both Central and South America. I went to Colombia to learn about Liberation theology, and I have been on several Witness For Peace trips to Nicaragua and Guatamala. I have been involved with the SOA protest on four occasions, and in 1997 was given a ban and bar letter after crossing the line. I believe I was called to cross the line again this year, risking arrest. Out of solidarity with the many who have been killed, I would find a time in jail an occasion for expressing my solidarity. I became acquainted with Sandor Cajena, six years old, who died of leukemia because of the US boycott of medical supplies, and of Carla Reyes, 16 years old who was killed in El Salvador. These along with the many who have been killed: four sisters, Archbishop Romero, the university professors and their housekeeper, Bishop Gerardi, the children of El Mozote, etc. I want to stand with these victims of graduates of the SOA and seek to close the school."


    Sentenced to 6 months federal prison and a $1,000 fine. In early October, Don was released from FCI Manchester.


  • Elizabeth Bradley, a former paralegal from Sacramento, California. Elizabeth was born in 1954, has four children, and is currently working full-time as an activist primarily around the issues of peace and social justice. She is an active member of Sacramento Area Peace Action and a member of Women's International League for Peace and Freedom.

    "I am appalled that a 'school' like the SOA exists anywhere in the world and am outraged that it exists in my country and is funded by my tax dollars. This was my first time at the SOA protest at Fort Benning. After hearing Sister Dianna Ortiz speak in Sacramento and subsequently reading her book,The Blindfold's Eyes, I felt compelled to "cross the line." I crossed the line not only for myself but for thousands of others who feel just as strongly as I do but are not at a place in their lives where they are able to cross. I crossed the line in the names of all those who have suffered at the hands of the graduates of this 'school.'

    "Although I do not look forward to spending time in prison, any consequences to me as a result of my act of conscience will be a cakewalk compared to the atrocities suffered by my Latin American sisters and brothers on a daily basis. It is a privilege to be a small part of this action and I am grateful for all the support from SOA Watch."


    Photo of Elizabeth being arrested

    Sentenced to 12 months probation and a $500 fine.


  • Cynthia Brinkman, SSND was born in 1936 and is from Ellington, Missouri. Cynthia is an educator at the Domestic Violence Shelter and a chaplain serving seriously ill persons.

    "Since 1977 my Latin American sisters and brothers have become real friends. Therefore, their sorrows and injustices are personal to me. I must confront my country when it betrays my trust and uses and abuses other countries and their citizens."


    Sentenced to six months federal prison. In early October, Sr. Cynthia was released from FCI Pekin in Illinois after completing her 6-month sentence.


  • David Corcoran is a hospital chaplain from Des Plaines, Illinois. Dave was born in 1934, is married to Barbara, and is the father of 3 adopted Korean children, Thomas, Christina, and Andrew.

    "The evil of the SOA/WHISC has been well documented and is still being committed in Central and South America. Other USA sponsored schools training terrorists for other countries (some 150 according to Amnesty International), located throughout the USA and in foreign countries, are paid for by my tax dollars and in my name. My action (crossing the property line at Ft. Benning) is to resist that evil with my whole being. It is a statement of 'NO, NOT IN MY NAME,' which speaks much louder and stronger than any words I can say.

    "At this time of a USA sponsored pre-emptive war of aggression against innocent men, women, children and the environment in Afghanistan and Iraq, it is even more essential to put my life on the line in resistance to all violence. My action is a statement that we are all one human family, each person is as precious as I am. I cannot go on living a normal life as if there were no USA caused crisis going on in our world. Peace cannot just be talked about. It is a matter of life and death for the voiceless and defenseless ones in third and fourth world countries. I speak and act for them no matter what the cost to me personally. I am a Christian and I must follow in Jesus' footsteps. I am a member of that one human family for which he suffered and died. I can do no less."


    Sentenced to six months in federal prison. Dave was released from FCI Oxford in Wisconsin in early October after completing his 6-month sentence.


  • Scott P. Diehl is the founder of God Bless the World. Scott was born in 1963, grew up in the Detroit area, and now lives in Burlington, Iowa. Scott is a part-time, professionally trained human rights worker with Christian Peacemaker Teams and the father of 14-year-old Zachary.

    Press release with statements by Scott
    A letter to the editor
    Scott Diehl's court statement


    Sentenced to 3 months and a $500 fine. Scott was released from FCI Waseca in Minnesota on July 2.


  • Faith Fippinger, a retired special-education teacher from Sarasota, Florida, was born in 1940. Originally from the Chicago area, Faith taught for 33 years, primarily blind/visually impaired elementary-level children.

    "Because of a humane caring for life on Earth, I went to Iraq as a human shield in peace and goodwill to stand beside the already suffering, innocent Iraqi people. I feel that the oppressive, murderous foreign policy needs to be stopped, whether it’s in Iraq or whether it’s through the training at the School of the Americas and what they do in Latin America."

    The St. Petersburg Times interviewed Faith in Coleman in June.
    The Bradenton Herald published an article about Faith in May.

    Sentenced to 3 months federal prison. Faith was released from FCI Coleman in Florida on July 2.


  • Alice E. Gerard, from Buffalo, New York, was born in 1956, has two parents, three sisters and two nephews. Alice is owned by a very vocal tortoiseshell cat, Sassafrass. Alice is the assistant managing editor of the Buffalo Alt Press. She has written extensively for Alt Press on Latin American issues and on the School of the Americas/Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation. In her spare time, Alice enjoys music, art, and crafts. Alice intends to write about the "inner journey" that she took when making the decision to "cross the line" at Fort Benning. She is grateful for all of the support that she's received thus far, especially for the help in coming up with all of that bond money to get her out of jail and home to her family and friends in time for Thanksgiving!


    Statement by Alice Gerard
    Alice Gerard's court statement
    Letter Alice wrote from Danbury in early May.
    July article by Alice: "How (Not to) Get an Education in Prison."

    Sentenced to 3 months and a $500 fine. Alice was released from FCI Danbury in Connecticut on July 2.


  • Fr. Ben Jimenez, S.J. of the St. Ignatius Jesuit Community in Cleveland, Ohio, climbed over the fence at Fort Benning, was arrested, and refused to post bond. He stayed in Muscogee County Jail from his arrest on November 23, 2003, through his trial on January 26, 2004, when he was released on time served.

    Statement by Ben and six other defendants in English and in Spanish.


    Ben was sentenced to 3 months and was released from Muscogee County Jail on January 26th with time served.


  • Sarah Jobe from Memphis, Tennessee, is studying to be a Baptist Pastor at Duke Divinity School.



    Sentenced to 12 months probation and a $1,500 fine.






  • Kathy Kelly, a peace activist from Chicago, was born in 1952 and is active in the Voices in the Wilderness campaign.

    "The assembly of peace activists who've created the SOA Watch campaign has demonstrated a terrific milestone in 'the further invention of nonviolence.'

    "Earlier this year, US military troops crossed the border between Iraq and Kuwait, invading Iraq, bringing death and destruction, on the theory that Iraq posed a threat to US people because it harbored weapons of mass destruction. To date, no WMD have been found. At Fort Benning, we crossed the line into an open military base, exercising our right to assemble peaceably for the redress of grievance. We were fully aware that the combat training school has engaged in massively destructive acts in the past. Public relations spokespeople for the school claim that the training of Latin American soldiers has now been reformed, teaching soldiers from other countries to observe the same regard for human rights and civil law that US Military Police observe. As achingly sad testimonies come in about the way that US Military Police treat 'suspect' Iraqi people, our responsibility to dramatize our challenge to the US Army School of the Americas remains quite strong.

    "I'm privileged to have been part of the group who entered Fort Benning this year, pointing toward our potential for unarmed resolution of disputes."


    A statement by Kathy and six other defendants in English and in Spanish.
    An article Kathy wrote from Pekin in May, published on Common Dreams.

    Sentenced to 3 months in federal prison. Kathy was released from FCI Pekin in Illinois on July 2.


  • Betsy (“Frances Elizabeth”) Lamb, 65, lives in Columbia, Maryland, and is a member of the national Board of Directors of Witness for Peace. She has done pastoral work in Catholic parishes in the Diocese of Monterey and the Archdioceses of San Francisco and Baltimore, and is nationally known for her workshops and materials for and about small church communities, in both English and Spanish. Presently she is working with the Office of Hispanic Ministry for the Archdiocese of Baltimore, and is involved with Jonah House in Baltimore. She holds a Master’s degree in theology—with an emphasis on religion and society—from the Pacific School of Religion in Berkeley, California.

    Statement by Betsy Lamb.
    Betsy's statement in court.

    Sentenced to six months in prison and a $500 fine. Betsy was released from FCI Danbury in Connecticut in early October after completing her 6-month sentence.


  • Ed Lewinson of Newark, New Jersey.

    After his initial arrest on Ft. Benning property, Ed was released instead of jailed. His charges were dropped at his arraignment, seemingly because of the belief among military police and a federal judge that he could not have chosen civil disobedience freely because he is legally blind.


  • Louise Lynch of Fremont, California is a former Registered Nurse and the mother of ten children. She is active with Pax Christi and serves her community with Meals on Wheels and at a soup kitchen.


    Sentenced to 12 months probation and a $500 fine.





  • Peg Morton, a retired mental health rural counselor from Eugene, Oregon, was born in 1930. Peg is a Quaker activist with three daughters and three grandchildren.

    "I have been to Guatemala many times, mainly as a part of international accompaniment for refugees on their returns from Mexico and in their returned communities. Through Witness for Peace and Peace Brigades International delegations, I have heard the stories of survivors of massacres and torture and have stayed in their dirt-floored huts. This was my fourth year at the Fort Benning demonstration, and the second time in which I purposely crossed the line in acts of civil disobedience. When fear rises in me as I consider going to prison, I have only to listen to my heart's memories of those stories. And I am strengthened and inspired by the courage of some who face regular death threats as they call for justice for the perpetrators. I am proud to be a part of this strong, courageous nonviolent movement that weaves itself from Fort Benning to the many countries of Latin America. I do believe that together we can raise awareness here of what U.S. policies really are, and we can close the school. I hope that our actions will contribute to the achievement of justice in Latin American countries also."

    Peg had a guest column published in Eugene's Register-Guard.
    The same newspaper a long story about Peg after her release from prison on July 2.

    Sentenced to 3 months in federal prison. Peg was released from FCI Dublin in California on July 2.


  • Fr. Joseph E. Mulligan, S.J., of the Detroit Province of the Society of Jesus, works with Christian base communities in Nicaragua, with Jesuit Volunteers International, with the handicapped, and on human-rights issues. Fr. Joe was sentenced to three months in prison on January 28, 2004, which he began serving immediately at the Muscogee County Jail in Columbus, Georgia. On February 23, he was moved to the Harris County (Georgia) Jail, approximately 25 miles north of Columbus. Fr. Joe was released on Friday, April 23 and spent that afternoon vigiling at the gates of Ft. Benning. Click here to read Fr. Joe's press release about the vigil.

    Statement by Fr. Mulligan and six other defendants in English and in Spanish.

    Statement by Fr. Mulligan about his ongoing fast in prison.
    Press release marking the end of Fr. Mulligan's fast
    An article about Fr. Mulligan's vigil at the gates of Ft. Benning on the day of his release from jail.
    An article by Fr. Mulligan published on Common Dreams.
    An op-ed published in The Miami Herald.

    Sentenced to and served three months in Muscogee and Harris County Jails.


  • Br. Mike O'Grady, S.J. of the Claver Jesuit Community of Cincinnati, Ohio, climbed over the fence at Fort Benning, was arrested, and refused to post bond. He remained in Muscogee County Jail from his arrest on November 23, 2003, through January 20, 2004. These 58 days were credited towards his 90-day sentence, leaving him 32 days in jail, beginning on January 27, 2004. He was released on Thursday, February 26.

    Link to a web page about Mike, published by his support community.

    An interview with Mike by the Cincinnati City Beat.
    Statement by Mike and six other defendants in English and in Spanish.

    Sentenced to and served 32 days in Muscogee County Jail.


  • Ozone of Duluth, Minnesota.

    I am a disciple of the lineage of Mahareishi Aryveda, and other esoteric teaching that promotes social well being.

    Ozone's sentencing statement.

    Sentenced to 3 months in federal prison. Ozone was released from FPC Duluth in Minnesota on August 1.



  • Gregory Poferl, a 57-year-old National Business Agent for the American Postal Workers Union, AFL-CIO, is from St. Paul, Minnesota. He produces the "Solidarity Kids Theater" in collaboration with the Labor Education Service, University of Minnesota, which provides grade-school and high-school students opportunities to get involved in social justice and labor issues.

    Greg's letter to his union sisters and brothers.
    Photo of Greg at the vigil.
    Greg's statement in court.
    A piece about Greg in May's Labor Notes.

    Sentenced to 3 months in federal prison and a $1,000 fine. Greg was released from FCI Waseca in Minnesota on July 2.


  • Eric Robison, from Bellingham, Washington, was born in 1980. Eric was fined $1,000 and sentenced to six months in prison on January 28, 2004, which he began serving immediately at the Muscogee County Jail in Columbus, Georgia. On February 23, he was moved to the Harris County (Georgia) Jail, approximately 25 miles north of Columbus. After spending several weeks in transit, Eric finally arrived at FPC Sheridan, the federal facility in Oregon where he will finish his term.

    Eric was sentenced to 6 months in federal prison and a $1000 fine. He was released from Oregon's Sheridan FPC on Friday, July 23.


  • Fr. Bernie Survil, is a Diocesan priest from the Diocese of Greensburg, Pennsylvania. He was born in 1940 in Olean, New York.

    "From 1975 to mid 2002 most of my time was working pastorally with the Catholic Church in El Salvador: 1975-1977), Nicaragua (1977--1986), Costa Rica (less than a year for having been expelled from Nicaragua by the Somoza Regime in 1978) and from 1990 to mid-2002 in Verapaz, Guatemala. This long experience gave me a first-hand knowledge of the affects of the militarization of Central America and the US 'military solution' for what it judged ailed the Region. I personally knew a number of the Salvadoran priests killed in those years, and had contact with Bishop Romero who entered the archbishopric of San Salvador as I had just 'left there' in Feb, 1977.

    "As a resident of Nicaragua during the Contra-War years, and presiding over the funerals parishioners killed during that war, and feeling the injustice of the Reagan Administration to reject the decision of the World Court which held the USA responsible for damages done through aiding of the Contra and financing & directing covert operations against the Nicaraguan infrastructure, the recommendations of Amnestry International's 2002 pronouncement about the responsbility of the USA for damages done through those trained at the SOA offers the present US Congress through HR 1258 to BEGIN to heal the long overdue change of US foreign policy toward Central and Latin America.

    "I would hope that my possible incarceration will serve as a reminder to those who know me that remembering, repenting and re-ordering is what the Lord of History expects of us as citizens of the Imperial United States of America. If the USA did the right thing 45 years after the internment of Japanese-Americans from 1942 to 1945, the same realization can dawn upon us for having operated the SOA/WHISC from 1946 to the present."


    Statement by Bernie and six other defendants in English and in Spanish.

    Sentenced to 3 months in federal prison. Fr. Bernie was released from FCI McKean in Pennsylvania on July 2.


  • Mary Vaughan is a retired elementary school teacher from White Bear, Minnesota. Mary was one of the SOA 26 and served six months in Pekin Federal Prison Camp for crossing the line in November 2000.

    "This November I crossed the line after much soul searching. I didn't make up my mind until the morning of the vigil. The most difficult part of saying 'yes' was considering the hardship that my family experienced in 2000. I believe in the closing of the SOA/WHISC, but also that this cause identifies with all the injustice throughout the world, especially now in Iraq. I want to speak for the all of the voiceless. I believe that I did some good the last time in prison and will again this time. I want to identify myself with the poor and those who do not have the choice to be imprisoned, because of unjust sentences. I hope that I get 6 months instead of 3 for the above reasons.

    "Thank you for your witness and support."


    Photo of Mary.

    Sentenced to 24 months probation and a $500 fine.


  • Michael Walli is from Duluth, Minnesota. Michael was fined $500 and sentenced to three months in prison on January 28, 2004, which he began serving immediately at the Muscogee County Jail in Columbus, Georgia. On February 23, he was moved to the Harris County (Georgia) Jail, approximately 25 miles north of Columbus. Michael was released on Friday, April 23.

    An article about Michael's vigil at the gates of Ft. Benning on the day of his release from jail.


  • Shirley Way, from Stanley, New York, born in 1961, daughter of two, sister of three. Shirley is a member of the Religious Society of Friends (Quaker) and a tutor and advocate for the children of migrant farmworkers and their families. She lived in Guatemala for 19 months, participated in a Christian Peacemaker Team delegation to Chiapas, Mexico in 2000, and was part of the CPT team for a few weeks in Chiapas in 2001.



    Statement by Shirley Way.
    Shirley Way's Trial Statement.

    Sentenced to 3 months federal prison. In late September, Shirley was released from FCI Danbury in Connecticut after completing her 6-month sentence.


  • Rich Wekerle, 67, is a retired New York City firefighter now living in Moscow, Idaho. He is married to Dana and has been involved with SOA Watch for six years. When Rich's son was a missionary in Colombia, Rich visited him and also traveled extensively in Central and Latin America. Rich has served two tours in the Peace Corps in Africa and recently drove with 17 University of Idaho students for a volunteer week in Tijuana.

    Rich's website
    Rich's statement in court.

    Sentenced to 6 months federal prison. In early October, Rich was released from FCI Sheridan in Oregon after completing his 6-month sentence.


  • Fr. Jerry Zawada is from Burlington, Wisconsin.

    Statement by Jerry and six other defendants in English and in Spanish.

    Sentenced to 6 months in federal prison. Jerry will be spending an extra month at Oxford, however, for a trespassing conviction from a nonviolent direct action in May 2003 at the US military's Project ELF missile-command tower in northern Wisconsin. He began his sentence at FCI Oxford in Wisconsin on April 6.





    Probationers of Conscience

    In early 2004, four people were sentenced to terms of probation ranging from 12 months to 24 months. These sentences can be as harsh as a prison term, as the probationer is prohibited from leaving a very small "home district", must submit monthly reports to their probation officer, and can be "violated" by their probation officer at any time, the consequences of which could actually include prison time for the defendant! As you can see, probationers need your support, too. If you wish to write to them, their addresses are listed below.


    Elizabeth Bradley

    Elizabeth began serving 12 months of probation on January 28, 2004.


    Sarah Jobe
    25 Georgetown Ct.
    Durham, NC 27705

    Sarah began serving her 12 months of probation on January 28, 2004.


    Louise Lynch
    42641 Sully St.
    Fremont, CA 94539

    Louise began serving her 12 months of probation on January 28, 2004.


    Mary Vaughn

    Mary began serving 24 months of probation on January 28, 2004.


    Arrested for Refusing to Submit to a Police Search

  • Karl Meyer is from Nashville, Tennessee and was born in 1937. Karl is a member of Nashville Greenland Community and has been an activist with the Catholic Worker movement for 44 years. Karl was one of the SOA 26 and served six months in prison for crossing the line in November 2000. Click here to read about Karl's refusals to submit to police searches at the 2002 and 2003 Vigils.


    Arrested for Accidentally Driving on an Interstate Highway Into Fort Benning

    Fifteen persons were arrested for occupying vehicles entering Fort Benning at different times on November 22 and 23, 2003. The various vehicles entered Fort Benning by missing Exit 1, which leads to the site of the SOA Watch rally, and remaining on Interstate 185 South. After misunderstanding directions given by military police, all occupants of each vehicle were arrested. Fort Benning is an "open base" with several public highways crossing it, but the defendants are being charged under a law that bars protests on military installations. After these defendants spent 1-2 nights in county jail, U.S. Magistrate G. Mallon Faircloth set bond at $1,000 for each driver, and released each passenger on their own recognizance, on November 24. All drivers were bailed out on the day of their arraignment.

    On January 8, the U.S. Attorney filed motions to drop charges on all of the persons who accidentally drove onto the base, preventing these unjustly arrested persons from having to go to trial.

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    Contact us

    SOA Watch
    733 Euclid Street NW
    Washington, DC 20001

    phone: 202-234-3440
    email: info@soaw.org